World Arts West
SF Ethnic Dance Festival

FESTIVAL DANCERS

El Tunante

DANCE ORIGIN: Peru
GENRE: Marinera
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: Nestor Ruiz
First Appearance in SF EDF: 1999
Email: nestormarinera06@yahoo.com

El Tunante, the first dance academy of marinera norteña in Northern California, was formed in Peru thirty years ago to promote the Peruvian marinera nationally and internationally. The group has been in the US since 1998. Artistic Director Nestor Ruiz, four-time national champion and renowned Peruvian dancer and teacher, danced professionally in Peru for many years, and has been named one of the best marinera dancers of all time. He is responsible for what many call “The Marinera Movement” in the US. The company produces quality dancers that compete at an international level and Ruiz dedicates his time to teach and mentor professional dancers.

2015 PERFORMANCE

TITLE: Marinera Norteña: A Visual History
CHOREOGRAPHER:
Nestor Ruiz
ARTISTIC ADVICE AND SUPPORT:
Gabriela Shiroma and De Rompe y Raja Cultural Association
DANCERS:
Jasslie Altamirano, Henry Dugarte, Melissa Feik, Luciana Fernandini, Daniella Magán, Diego Magán, Jose Miralles, Diego Oliva, Samantha Payne, Ashley Peña, Chistopher Peña, Marjorie Quispe, Saya Quiroz, Jacky Rivera, Nestor Ruiz, Rubi Sarmiento, Nicholás Tuccio, Sebastian Tuccio
MUSICIANS:
Marina Marchena (lead vocals), Peta Robles Izquierdo (lead cajón), Vladimir Vucanovich (guitar)

Peruvian-born Nestor Ruiz is known as one of the best marinera dancers of all time. In this performance, he brings us eighteen dancers, presenting his choreography of Marinera Norteña.

Within a tight sequence of sweet coquettish dancing, partners enact a romantic game of cat and mouse. The men move close and the women move closer. The partners never touch, and never take their eyes off one another. The dance is intense and formal, with fluttering handkerchiefs to reveal what happens in the heart. Male dancers sometimes perform the marinera on the back of a dancing horse, and in the men’s cepillado and zapateo footwork, high steps mimic the prancing of a horse. The women dance barefoot, with especially expressive footwork.

The Marinera derived from the zamacueca, a dance form born around 1800 during Peru’s struggle for independence from Spain. The zamacueca originated in crowded colonial ports, merging stylized Spanish court dance, lively African rhythms and footwork, and indigenous Peruvian forms. The zamacueca spread throughout Latin America during the wars of independence and returned to Peru as a dance form called chilena. In the late 1870s, amid political tensions between Peru and Chile, journalist and songwriter Abelardo Gamarra proposed the name change from chilena to marinera, as a way to honor the Marina de Guerra del Perú, the Peruvian Navy, for its efforts in the war against Chile. Today, the marinera is considered Peru’s national dance.

The colonial style of this dance was restrained, with women’s bare feet adding to the simplicity, and the dance gradually evolved its quick expressiveness. Various provinces in Peru have also interpreted the form over the years with unique regional styles.The Marinera Norteña is from the northern city of Trujillo, and it’s an especially lively form of the dance.

The men wear traditional wide-brimmed hats and ponchos. The women’s dresses are from cities of northern Peru‚ adorned with indigenous Moche lace that is famed for its fragile elegance.

The music, influenced by African rhythms, is played in 6/8, accompanied by Spanish guitars and the Afro-Peruvian cajón box drum. For this performance, the traditional group consists of a singer, guitar player, and the national female champion Peta Robles Izquierdo on cajón. 

2013 PERFORMANCE

DANCE ORIGIN: North Peru
GENRE: Marinera
TITLE: Marinera Norteña
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR/CHOREOGRAPHER: Néstor Ruiz
DANCERS: Magally M. Cespeda, Daniel; Choy, Farah Concha, Luciana Fernandini, Daniella Magan, Diego Magan, Renato Manay, Renzo Manay, Marjorie Quispe, Néstor Ruiz, Stephan Sester, Sissy Soria, Ashlie Vera, Junior Vilcherrez
MUSICIANS: Marina Marchena (vocals), Pedro Rosales (percussion),Vladimir Vucanovich (percussion)

Champion Peruvian dancer Nestor Ruiz presents the classy couple’s dance, La Marinera Norteña. The marinera is the Peruvian National Dance, a form with three distinct styles. In Lima, DANCERS perform the marinera Limena: on the coast, the style is marinera costena; and this performance of marinera nortena comes from northern Peru— from Trujillo. Like many dance and music forms in Peru, marinera nortena draws from Peru’s culturally-diverse communities, especially port towns where Spanish, African, and indigenous dancersshared traditional styles and rhythms. In 1893, during a concert with the dancer Rosa de Morales, Abelardo Gamarra—also known as “El Tunante”—formally dubbed the dance la marinera, in homage to the Admiral of the Peruvian Navy.

This elegant performance is like a seductive, stylized courtship with tightly synchronized sequences. In Peru, this dance is sometimes performed outside, with El Chalan—the male dancer—on horseback. Peruvian Paso horses are trained in subtle dance steps, and their male riders lean gracefully towards their partners, women dancing barefoot in the dirt. In staged choreography, the men’s high steps imitate the horse and the women draw pictures on the floor with their expressive bare feet. Watch also for the very close partner dancing known as coqueteo, and the championship level footwork of cepillado and zapateo.

2012 PERFORMANCE

TITLE: Marinera Norteña
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: Nestor Ruiz
MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Alberto Morales
DANCERS: Alejandra Chumbe, Cesilia Fey, Renato Manay, Renzo Manay, MargorieQuisbe, Nestor Ruiz
CHILDREN DANCERS: Luciano Fernandini, David Ferreira, Diego Hagan, Daisy Polanio
MUSICIANS: Banda Peru: Ryan Black (euphonium), Mike Garcia (tuba), Hermann Lara (tenor saxophone),Alberto Morales (trombone), Augusto Sandoval (drums), Edward Sandoval(cymbals), Percy Sandoval (bass drum), Daniel Ventura (trumpet)

The marinera is the Peruvian National Dance, one of the most elegant dances in Peru. In Lima, it’s marinera Limeña; on the coast, it’s marinera costeña; and in Trujillo and the North, it’s the lively marinera norteña, the form presented. The men wear traditional wide-brimmed hats and ponchos. The women’s dresses are from cities of northern Peru‚ including Moche, the source of elegant lace, and Trujillo, the marinera capital.

The dance begins with the men demonstrating marinera norteña choreography. This version includes steps that imitate the Peruvian Paso horse, and the music directs the gait. Next the women dance, their expressive bare feet drawing images on the ground, their skirts swishing like ocean waves. To complete the set, the couples unite. Their steps include the coqueteo, with partners dancing very closely, and the skillful cepillado brushing footwork. El Tunante describes the dance:
She, with her gathered skirt seems to leave her agile feet free sweeping the ground with the fury and the passion of her joy. He, with his desire contained, expresses with the force of his dance the passion of his conquest.

Marinera dancers are typically accompanied by Spanish guitars, an Afro-Peruvian cajón box drum, spoons that substitute for Spanish castanets, and palmadas or handclaps. This presentation featured the lively Banda Peru, including musicians on tuba, trumpet, trombone, drums, and cymbals.

2011 PERFORMANCE

El TunanteTITLE: Marinera Peruana
MUSICAL DIRECTOR:
Alberto Morales
DANCERS:
Alejandra Chumbes, Cesilia Fey, Renato Manay, Renzo Manay, Sonia Porras de Niño de Guzmán, Nestor Ruiz
MUSICIANS:
Jose Castillo (euphonium), Pedro Castillo (trumpet), James Cuba (tuba), Hernan Lara (alto sax), Alberto Morales (trombone), Augusto Sandoval (drum), Edward Sandoval (cymbal), Percy Sandoval (drum)

The marinera is the Peruvian National Dance, one of the most elegant dances in Peru. In Lima, it’s marinera Limeña; on the coast, it’s marinera costeña; and in Trujillo and the North, it’s the lively marinera norteña, the form presented. The men wear traditional wide-brimmed hats and ponchos. The women’s dresses are from cities of northern Peru‚ including Moche, the source of elegant lace, and Trujillo, the marinera capital.

The dance begins with the men demonstrating marinera norteña choreography. This version includes steps that imitate the Peruvian Paso horse, and the music directs the gait. Next the women dance, their expressive bare feet drawing images on the ground, their skirts swishing like ocean waves. To complete the set, the couples unite. Their steps include the coqueteo, with partners dancing very closely, and the skillful cepillado brushing footwork.

El Tunante describes the dance: She, with her gathered skirt seems to leave her agile feet free sweeping the ground with the fury and the passion of her joy. He, with his desire contained, expresses with the force of his dance the passion of his conquest.

Marinera dancers are typically accompanied by Spanish guitars, an Afro-Peruvian cajón box drum, spoons that substitute for Spanish castanets, and palmadas or handclaps. This presentation featured a traditional marching band.

2010 PERFORMANCE

Title: La Marinera Norteña
Dancers
: Luisa Lopez Saavedra, Zarella Mazzini, Nestor Ruiz, Jorge Ventemillia
Musicians:
Banda Peru - David Carr (baritone saxophone), Pedro Castillo (trumpet), James Cuba (tuba), Andrea Fennern (trombone), Santiago Israel (trombone), Hernan Lara (saxophone), Joao Martins (trumpet), Nathan Mck Griff (saxophone), Alberto Morales (Director), Nick Rous (saxophone), Luis Sandoval (cymbal), Percy Sandoval (drum), Daniel Ventura (trumpet) 

For fifty years, regional and national competitions have challenged dancers to add a personal touch as they perfect the marinera and contribute to its evolution. El Tunante presented award-winning performers from the national contest in Trujillo, showcasing the highest achievement in La Marinera Norteña. The first dance showed the colonial style: a restrained style in which the women's bare feet simplify the eloquence. The second piece showed the contemporary form. It combineed the quick pace of the tondero of Piura and the expressive characteristics of the marinera Limeña.

For this performance, Nestor performed alongside Peruvian national marinera champions Zarella Mazzini, Luisa Lopez Saavedra, and Jorge Ventemillia. The live band of thirteen musicians, Banda Peru, performs accompaniment on the trumpet, saxophone, baritone saxophone, trombone, tuba, marching drum, cymbal, and drum.

2009 PERFORMANCE

Title: Marinera Norteña
Dancers:
Erica Clancy, Sonia Porras Niño de Guzman, Nestor Ruiz, Stephan Sester
Musicians:
Oscar Abanto (guitar), Marina Marchena (vocals), Javier Muton (cajón), Vladimir Vucanovich (guitar)

The music starts. A man and a woman look into each other’s eyes. The challenge begins. She raises her handkerchief and smiles, offering enchantment. He greets her, hat in hand, and announces with elegant and decided steps that he is a great connoisseur of this game. They dance around each other, testing that sweetness of moving close. Feet pound the floor in zapateo rhythms. Barefoot, she whirls her skirt, escaping his advances. The would-be-conqueror is conquered, his handkerchief playing in his fingers like a dove…

2007 PERFORMANCE

TITLE: La Marinera
GENRE: Marinera Norteña
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR/ CHOREOGRAPHER: Nestor Ruiz Gil
DANCERS: Sara Arrescurenaga, Cesilia Fey, Erica Flores, Shanty Gupta, Christopher Leon, Oscar Leon, Carlos Robles, Marimar Robles, Nestor Ruiz, Stephan Sester, Junior Vilcherrez
MUSICIANS: Marina Marchena, Pedro Rosales, Vladimir Vucanovich

With its spiraling choreography and suave footwork, the marinera is called “the lovers’ dance,” as couples are said to fall in love when dancing it. Joyous and flirtatious, it is danced either in couples or groups of couples. A playful courtship ritual between a man and a woman is enacted. With eye-to-eye contact, the woman teases the man with her coquettish feminine wiles and provocative tosses of her handkerchief. The man, with elegant comportment and self-assured steps, is a connoisseur of the game. Using his hat to court her, he moves closer to circle her and, employing cunning charm and agile feet, they whirl around each other without making physical contact.

2006 PERFORMANCE

TITLE OF PIECE: La Marinera
GENRE: Marinera Nortena
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR/
CHOREOGRAPHER:
Nestor Ruiz
DANCERS & MUSICIANS: Sarita Arrescurinaga, Vladimir Bukanovitch, Shanty Gupta, Sonia Manay, Marina Marchena, Nestor Ruiz, Stephan Sester, Sissi Sorio, Jose Terrones, Lalo Izquierda

With its spiraling choreography and suave footwork, the marinera is often referred to as “the lovers’ dance” as couples are believed to fall in love when dancing it. Joyous and flirtatious, it is danced in couples or groups of couples. Contained within the group dances is a playful courtship ritual between a man and a woman. The dance starts with a greeting and ends with a fugue to drum rhythms. With eye-to-eye contact, the woman teases the man with coquettish feminine wiles and provocative tosses of her handkerchief. The man, with elegant comportment and self-assured steps, is a connoisseur of the game. Using his hat to court her, he moves closer to circle her and, employing cunning charm and agile feet, they whirl around each other without making physical contact.

The song is an ode to love describing a man singing to a woman, petitioning her to come out and dance to his sweet tunes and rhythms of the drums. It is typically performed with the Spanish guitar and cajón, a wooden box drum originating from African slaves.

2005 PERFORMANCE

TITLE OF PIECE: MARINERA DIRECTOR/ CHOREOGRAPHER: Nestor Ruiz
DANCERS:
Sarita Arrescurrinaga, Limena Egoavil, Shanti Gupta, Magaly Marchena, Renato Nanay, Renzo Nanay, Eduardo Pastor, Cesar Quiroz, Nestor Ruiz, Jorge Sebastiani, Sonia Sester, Stephan Sester, Anna Gil Vasquez, Flor Ventura
MUSICIANS:
Maria Marchena, Javier Nunton, Pedro Rosales, Vladimir Vikanovich

With its spiraling choreography and suave footwork, the Marinera is often referred to as "the lovers dance" because it is believed that couples fall in love when they dance it. Joyous and flirtatious, it is danced in couples or groups of couples. Contained within the group dances is a playful courtship ritual between a man and a woman. With eye-to-eye contact, the woman teases the man with her coquettish feminine wiles and provocative tosses of her handkerchief. The man, with elegant comportment and self-assured steps is a connoisseur of the game. Using his hat to court her, he is ready to conquer as he moves closer to circle her. Employing their cunning charm and agile feet, they whirl around each other without making physical contact.

The scarf symbolizes beauty and purity. The song is an ode to love describing a man singing to a woman petitioning her to come out and dance to his tunes. It is typically performed with the guitar and cajon, a wooden box drum.

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